The Pride Mile

Annie Jose

Annie Jose

India COE

 

The child donned a red hat and knelt down on the edge of the sidewalk, water strewn from yesterday’s rain. He set down his can of paint, roughly half his size. And then he set to work, right next to many more volunteers of the Adopt-A-Mile program. The sheer willingness and determination that he sported in the middle of the day amidst traffic and dust was enough to empower the rest of us.

The Garden City- Bangalore’s moniker from once upon a time doesn’t seem to fit her anymore. Exponential growth resulted in more jobs, more people, more pollution, more demolition. Governments may not be able to curb the effect this has on our environment. But they can achieve this if we don’t just stand by them, but join them. This very initiative took birth in the Adopt-A-Mile program. Started in collaboration with BBMP (Bangalore’s municipal government), Adopt-A-Mile invites corporate employees and their families to volunteer for a few hours of their free time for their city.   EMC joined the bandwagon soon enough , and what better day to contribute to the cause than Independence Day.

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Our journey started with our EMC crew closing in on the perfect mile of road to beautify. We set out at dawn, wearing our custom hats and shirts, holding our broomsticks and paint brushes. The mission at hand was total annihilation of garbage and dirt, and adorning the place with colors of endearment. The particular mile we were dealing with had to endure quite a bit in the past. It was downright ugly. The path was covered with uneven mud, puddles of dirty water and the red outline of Paan spit by negligent pedestrians. We had a lot to cover, and we got right into it. Brooms got all the dust away. Concrete tiles were laid across the entire span. Algae and weed were brushed off from the edges. And we painted. From lamp posts to separators, nothing survived the jolly colors spewing out of our paint brushes. Random people walking by turned into well-wishers and then fellow volunteers, as they yearned to get in on the action.

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In four hours, we managed to make over a lucky mile of normal road into a site that was spectacular. We attained a sense of pride and achievement looking at our work. Tomorrow the people will notice the change as they enter our mile. And we hope they are as amazed and motivated as we were. What if they want to see the same on the adjacent road. What if they took the initiative on their own? We would be starting a revolution. And that’s just from one mile.

EMC Singapore Give Back – Willing Hearts Soup Kitchen

Kristine Yeow

Kristine Yeow

Human Resources

 

This post was co-authored by Carris Chen.

I had the opportunity to serve at Willing Hearts Soup Kitchen in August with Carris Chen using one of the three days CSR leave EMC offers their employees.

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Willing Hearts soup kitchen provide daily meals and support services to the underprivileged, the needy, and other marginalized members of our Singapore society. The kitchen was huge (owing to the large quantities of food that they have to produce daily), with many facilities and equipment that we had never seen before.

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One example would be that they actually use a cement mixer to make fried rice… How unbelievable is that?!

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We got there at around 9 am in the morning and our role was mainly to cut away the tougher ends of the broccoli stems to get to the softer and tastier bits at the core.

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We did that for several hours, in between, teaching students, who were on an excursion, how to cut and peel as well. Subsequently, we were given a mini tour around the kitchen by one of the people in charge and had a glimpse of how the whole place works!

It was heartwarming to hear of the stories shared, of how our seemingly small effort was able to help make the lives of the underprivileged a little better. At the same time, it also made us reflect on how fortunate all of us are.

Overall, it was a great experience for both of us and we will definitely be back again to serve and help out.

Thanks EMC for giving us a day off to do this!

Technology and Talent from the Customer Perspective

Tom Murray

Tom Murray

Chief Talent Officer

 

At EMC, our success is directly tied to the commitment we make to place our customers first. This is illustrated so well by everyone who has a role in delivering the Total Customer Experience (TCE). Our leadership in TCE separates us from the competition and gives us momentum as we define ourselves as a third platform player and a great place to work.

I meet regularly with customers at our Executive Briefing Center, but for different reasons than most leaders. In addition to technology, our customers want to talk talent. They want to hear how we are attracting, developing and retaining the best people. As our industry has changed, our talent strategy has kept pace. Qualities we seek in today’s candidates are quite different than what we looked for in the past. Today we look for skills that can help us realize our innovative path to the third platform and strengthen the overall EMC Federation. We also look for people who will build our bench of versatile, agile leaders who will be able to take on multiple roles during their EMC careers.

All customers say that they want to have the best talent, and they know that keeping the best people is as important as hiring them. I talk with our customers about the direct correlation between retaining talent and offering development and career opportunities. At EMC we want to give everyone the opportunity to further their careers, regardless of level or role. The coursework and development roadmaps we offer through EMC University and Educational Services are some of the best anywhere, and they are made better by the contributions of our own internal experts.

My overall message to customers is that the market for technology talent is more competitive than ever – if talent is not at the top of your company’s business imperatives, then you will be left behind. I encourage them to think about David Goulden’s view of EMC – that we are a people company in the technology business. With that perspective, we are able to deliver a Total Customer Experience unlike any other.

My thanks to our global customers and all of our EMC colleagues who define TCE!

Learn more about EMC’s Total Customer Experience Program and how we are celebrating our commitment to customers and recognizing our passionate employees on October 7th—Total Customer Experience Day.

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EMC ‘Pays it Forward’ with Fast Lane Internship

Jessica Kline

Jessica Kline

Marketing Development Associate, Global Communications

 

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending some presentations given by high school interns at EMC through a pilot program that focuses on strengthening opportunities for youth in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers. This summer, EMC gave eight high school women the opportunity to immerse themselves in the EMC culture and play an important role in the business by working with some of the company’s most dynamic and accomplished leaders.

Before the intern presentations began, Jackie Glenn, EMC’s Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, opened with a brief overview of the program, explaining why programs like this are not only influential but extremely important to EMC’s business. Her comments were followed by EMC’s Carolyn Muise, one of the internship Executive Sponsors, and Victoria Waterman, CEO of Girls Inc. of Worcester. Victoria shared why she takes great pride in connecting young women to inspirational business leaders and increasing opportunities for STEM education.

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This internship pilot program exists for many reasons, but to put it simply, if you are black, Hispanic, or low-income, you’re less likely to find employment opportunities compared to someone in a different race or class according to the Boston Globe.  Also, 80% of the fastest growing jobs in the United States depend upon math and science skills with only 13% of girls saying they plan to pursue a STEM career according to the January 2014 edition of US World & News Report.  Yes, we have the likes of women like Sheryl Sandberg and Ruchi Sanghvi who have already begun to break the glass ceiling for women working in technology, but that still doesn’t seem to be enough because much work remains to engage women to fulfill STEM leadership roles.

EMC does a fantastic job at investing in these young women’s futures and this pilot program is very exciting. The program includes three key elements:

  • Executive Sponsorship: As mentioned, the program is sponsored by senior women at EMC.  The girls selected to participate in this program are assigned to an executive’s team here at EMC.
  • Skills Power: EMC Subject Matter Experts train the group on various topics like personal branding, effective interviewing, and social media best practices.
  • Fast Forward: Guest speakers like Jessica Anderson, Director of Community Involvement, and Marisol Churchill, Principal IT Product Manager, came in to discuss their career paths and the importance of working hard.

The students who participated in the program absolutely loved it and said that the most engaging aspect – the area that resonated the most – was when speakers were brought in to give their own personal advice.

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Jackie Glenn could not have said it better in the opening of the hour when she thanked all of the sponsors who helped make this program such a success, and informed them that without even realizing it each of them changed one of these young woman’s lives. So thank you EMC, you’ve made your mark.

Walking Backwards To Move Forward: Working Together To Fight Cancer

Gary Bastarache

Gary Bastarache

EMC Customer Service

 

For the past 21 years, I have participated in the Boston Marathon® Jimmy Fund Walk, which has raised over $100 million to support the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. I have walked hundreds of miles and raised thousands of dollars in honor of a growing list of friends and family members affected by cancer. I am proud to share that I will join this important event again this year on September 21st and join more than 8,500 people expected to participate in this year’s Walk. I hope to see you at this year’s event, and in case you don’t recognize me…just look for the guy walking 26.2 miles backwards!

 

A Different Approach To Training

Since March, I have been training to walk long distances backwards on treadmills at a local gym and conquering laps around a high school track close to my home in Massachusetts. I have completed the Walk backwards twice before—this year will probably be my final time walking the Marathon backwards as I turned 50 this year and not getting any younger and I intend to finish strong! I am so happy that my older brother, Carl, a 19-year Walk participant himself, will serve as my eyes along the 26.2 mile route. My inspiration to take on this somewhat unique challenge came from a former boss…I’m glad he suggested walking and not running backwards!

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Team EMC

Not only does the Jimmy Fund have a special place in my life, but it is a common source of inspiration for “Team EMC”. This dedicated team of 10 to 20 employees has walked together since 2002. It is extremely gratifying to know that the people I work with every day care so deeply about giving back to serve those in need. One of the most inspiring experiences the EMC Team has shared is to connect with Dana-Farber cancer patients through the Jimmy Fund “Walk Hero Program”. In the past few years, Team EMC has been matched with six pediatric cancer patients through this program, including our 2014 Walk Hero, Christopher Bartorelli. We had the great fortune to meet Christopher and his family at a bowling event this year and left feeling even more inspired and committed to the cause.

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Over the past two decades, I have learned that every step we take on the day of the Walk represents how much closer we are to finding a cure for cancer. I believe that a cure is possible. I believe that when we come together, we can make a real difference in the lives of cancer patients. I believe that crossing that finish line is about providing hope to our Walk Hero, Christoper Bartorelli, my 82-year old father, Laurier, a prostate cancer survivor and thousands of others who fight with such courage every day. I am committed to the fight. Team EMC is proud to support this noble cause. I hope you will join the fight and take a step forward (or backwards) to support the Jimmy Fund.

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Join The Fight

 

 

Bringing EMC Values to Africa

Mohamed Kante

Mohamed Kante

Advanced Design Services

 

I thought what I wanted to do would get me fired.

My dream is to give young people in the part of world I came from, Africa, the same opportunity that I have had – to get a world class education in Engineering and to work at a world class enterprise like EMC helping to shape the future. As I studied engineering I also began learning everything I could about social entrepreneurship, seizing every opportunity I could get to pitch in as a volunteer with groups working to make our world a better place. I used the skills I had acquired to found iNERDE, a non-profit organization that is bringing STEM education and training in critical problem solving and innovation to kids in Africa.

I’m an optimist; but as optimistic as I am, I don’t think I was fully prepared for how fast iNERDE would take off. People got it. African kids have the same capacity as kids anywhere else in the world to achieve excellence. They have perhaps more determination today to create opportunity for themselves and the resilience to overcome many obstacles to get there. What they don’t have is access to a first-class education with a curriculum that will give them the skills to be competitive in our modern world. iNERDE aims to be a part of the change that is needed, and many talented and dedicated people soon joined me to turn that vision into a plan of action. We are all “nerds”, technological – scientists and engineers, students and professionals, busy people with full-time occupations – but we all gave our nights and weekends to create the first STEM iNERDE project, a 7-week summer camp.

I am from the West African country of Mali and we decided to run our pilot camp there, since I had the connections to bring together all the elements we needed. We founded legal entities in the United States and in Mali, created a website and a Facebook page, and started fundraising. We secured a partner school and facilities in Mali and pulled together a curriculum. We ran around finding supplies for the students’ STEM projects, such as solar-powered cars, spaghetti bridges, and egg parachutes. We assembled a class of 30 students, got our vaccinations, booked our plane tickets, and, miracle of miracles, we were ready to hold the first iNERDE STEM Camp in Bamako, Mali this summer.

That’s when I was sure I would be fired. There was no backing out at that point. I owed it to the kids, my collaborators, and to my dream to make it happen. I didn’t expect EMC to become one of the supporters that would join in the effort to turn my dream into reality, and accommodate my two month leave of absence to get iNERDE’s first camp off the ground. I was wrong. EMC got it and my managers worked to come up with a plan that enabled me to go to Mali.

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My leave from EMC was a lot to ask, but this was only the beginning of the support and encouragement I received from the company. I’ve had the opportunity to share my experience with iNERDE at Americas/EMEA Global Talent All Hands Meetings. I was offered the opportunity to write this blog, and I am discussing various types of active and ongoing participation with EMC in future iNERDE summer camps and other projects. What I have found is that EMC is truly committed to STEM education not only in local communities, but in the world. EMC may not do as much business in Africa today as it does in other parts of the world, but the company recognizes that Africa is important to its own future business and to the growth of opportunity and prosperity across the globe.

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I am very proud to work for EMC and I felt very happy to come back home to the work that means so much to me after earning a “mission accomplished” in Mali. Although our kids do not yet know the extent of EMC’s support, it meant a great deal to them that I, Mohamed Kante, just another kid from Mali like them, had succeeded in becoming an engineer at a leading technology company and that I came back to Mali to tell them that they could do the same. My work at EMC is more to me than just being a Test Engineer; I have the extraordinary privilege of being an example and an inspiration to a group of bright, beaming kids in Bamako. I think that all of us who are so lucky to be at EMC can have a comparable opportunity.

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So what is next for iNERDE? Bigger, better, more camps empowering more kids, some exciting new programs, including the addition of a week-long hack-a-thon. We would like to get corporate sponsors more closely involved with the schools and kids and I hope someday soon to bring some of my EMC colleagues to Mali or elsewhere in Africa to participate directly in the STEM camps. Please visit our website, inerde.org, or our Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/inerde, sign up for our mailing list and learn how you can support our efforts.

EMC Gives Back: Time Off to Give Back

Meghan Musante

Meghan Musante

EMC Global Services Marketing

 

“Social” communication has exploded in recent years and there are few companies taking better advantage of this than EMC. My previous work lives were spent in the newspaper and biotechnology industries. Blogs went mainstream in 2004 and Twitter was founded in 2006, both after I left newspapers and landed at a biotech company in Cambridge. With FDA regulations and pending drug approvals, you can imagine that participation in social media was not embraced or encouraged. Tweets were sent through corporate channels for approval and posted through the company handle. It was very different than the high tech world I find myself in now at EMC. There are so many channels of individual expression available at EMC – from internal and external blogs, to “public” and “private” groups on our collaborative intranet “Inside EMC,” to multiple handles on Twitter to follow, favorite and retweet. It’s communication made easy and it’s all part of EMC’s journey as a Great Place to Work.

I was fortunate to join EMC in May while efforts to elevate EMC as a Great Place to Work were in full swing. We watched two World Cup games together as a Global Services Marketing team – picture colleagues dressed in Germany and Mexico jerseys, waving Argentinian flags and trash talking Dutch fans (not really, but we did have some fun with it!). We gathered in the parking lot for a cookout for the entire building to promote the new Inside EMC. Most importantly, in my opinion, we spent half-day shifts at a Habitat for Humanity home in Worcester, MA.

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In total, 40 of us spent hours that day digging up a walkway, caulking windows and painting — LOTS of painting! It was the perfect teambuilding activity and way to give back to the community. I know many, including myself, appreciated the opportunity to volunteer during the workday. With commutes, work, children, pets and extracurricular activities, it’s tough to find that chunk of time that you can dedicate to something outside of your everyday routine.

Musante4That’s one of the reasons I’m very excited about the new program EMC has implemented called “Time Off to Give Back.” This program allows my EMC colleagues to take three days off each year to give back to their communities. This can be done individually or as a group, like the Global Services Marketing team did that day in late June for Habitat for Humanity. I don’t know about you, but I think that’s a solid way to spend a day! How will you contribute to your community this year? Where will I find you during those three days of giving back?

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No Time to Rest on Your Laurels – GESLDP

Luis Marin

Luis Marin

Global Enterprise Services LDP

 

After one year in the Global Enterprise Services Leadership Development Program (GESLDP), I wanted to share my thoughts about this uncommon full-time job. It is uncommon because, as you will read below, I rotate every few months, I network extensively outside my functional group, and in a year, I know I will need to find another job. This blog post is about the program, my experience, and the development opportunities I have had, so those three words will be reiterated many times throughout this post.

Most Fortune 500 companies have implemented leadership development programs as a way to attract high potential recent graduates and accelerate their career paths to become a new generation of leaders. At EMC, we have many of these programs: IT, HR, GES, Finance, Marketing, Business Ops., etc. Each program coordinates a rigorous screening and hiring process domestically and globally to select the next class of participants and the company’s future leaders. This talent strategy allows the company to attract top talent and fast-track recent graduates who quickly learn that once they start, there is no time to rest on their laurels.

“Networking, networking, networking” and “Nothing happens until you write it down”

Those were some of the first lessons the Global Enterprise Services LDP class Program Director told us in the 2013 New Hire Orientation. Over the course of two years, program participants rotate into different areas within GES. So far, the sixteen of us that joined in 2013 have had at least two different rotational managers in different areas and in different roles. One of the key aspects of development while in the program is that you never feel too comfortable in your role. You need to adapt and be ready for change.

Back in July last year I started working with Kenny Loo, a great kickball player and an even better manager with a deep knowledge of EMC and the CS area. I learned all about VSPEX, our different solutions and the Regatta Lifecycle. For my second rotation I wanted to understand the challenges that a fast growing region experiences such as Latin America, APJ or any of the BRIC countries. For that purpose, under the leadership of Eleonora Ferrari and Santiago Belaustegui, I have supported remotely the Professional Services organization in Latin America and experienced the entrepreneurial and results-oriented mentality of the team. For my third rotation, at the beginning of July I relocated to the Bay Area to work for Pivotal PS@EMC to help them with reporting around sales forecasts, revenue, booking, utilization and anything the management team led by Chris Birtwhistle needs to better track their business. My motivation for this move has been experiencing the start-up kind of work style where there is always a lot of work to do and not many processes in place while comparing the cultural differences working out of the Pivotal offices in Palo Alto and San Francisco.

You could ask, “What’s the point of rotating people so fast? They are never going to perfect anything. They are never going to be high performers in their teams.” Using the Situational Leadership Theory to analyze the GESLDPer in terms of individual development (see image), you will see that during each rotation a person will go from a D1 stage where they are highly committed but have low competency to a D3 level at best. Imagine the capacity to adapt, learn, and look for ways to add value for a person that rotates three of four times over the period of two years. At the same time, the business unit gets the benefit of having an extra resource in the short term and the company will get the largest benefit in a longer term, when we graduate.

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You have read my rotational experiences, but that is only me. Imagine close to thirty people having these experiences and sharing them with the rest of the group. What makes this group an extraordinary team and a great place to work is that although you rarely work with other people in the program, they are your support group because they are facing everything you are going through, and they have the same energy and motivation to leave a mark. We develop such good relationships that it is not uncommon for us to organize trips together, practice sports together, or meet in the city during the weekend.

Following that thought, it is important to note that being part of a program, we are in parallel helping to build bridges between different EMC groups that are traditionally not visibly connected. In a way, we are a social tool and, in my opinion, this is one of our key assets. EMC is developing employees that are not strictly focused on their daily jobs and the tasks at hand, but developing employees with insights into different areas of the company and the ability to move horizontally. We meet with other managers in other business units, participate in different employee circles such as the Women Leadership Forum or EMC Latin Leadership Interest Team, consult for some of the winning projects in EMC’s Innovation Challenge and take part in multiple social initiatives.

It is important to me to point out that the program provides structure for coaching and mentorship, but in the end you are responsible for leading your own career. This aspect of the program is what makes it a true development program and is one of the best characteristics of the GESLDP. The program has some structure in terms of the duration of the rotation; though after the participant’s first rotation, he or she needs to network extensively and find his or her next opportunity, including a rotation outside corporate. You are not told that after one rotation where you learn “X”, now you must learn “Y”. With guidance from the program, your development is in your hands and you have the freedom to create rotation opportunities that are unique to you and your interests. What all GESLDP participants have in common is that at the end of the program, we have experienced different leadership styles from each rotational manager, the functional areas of GES, and different environments working with small or large groups that can be either local or remote. Some managers are very hands-on, some are great mentors, and others will be very hands-off in a go-find-out-yourself mode. This flexibility and variability in experiences makes the program a developmental one instead of a training program.

Our final assignment in the program is finding a full time position. After all our hard work and networking, we have made connections with senior leaders and have experience in CS, PS, Portfolio, Marketing, the partners’ organization, finance, you name it. We have experience in Corporate and in the field. We know where the opportunities are in the company and that it is time to consider where we will have a larger impact in the organization. It is time for us to become high performing D4s – highly committed and highly competent.

This blog post is dedicated to the 2014 graduating class, to Paula Spears, and Leslie Russell, who have mentored us this last year, and to wish the best to our new manager, Mark Aguiar, and the new talented group of GESLDPers that has just joined us.

My Biggest Learning Experience

Bradley Clements

Bradley Clements

DPAD - Data Protection and Availability Division

 

My first day as an intern in EMC’s Data Protection and Availability (DPAD) division was May 27th, 2014. I remember that day clearly. I walked into the building very disoriented and overwhelmed in many ways. It was such a large building with so many people all around me and I began to feel nervous. I went up to the security officer at the front desk and told them it was my first day and I was told to ask them to call someone to come down to the lobby and get me. The officer immediately welcomed me to EMC and started a regular conversation with me. I didn’t realize it at the time, but the officer made my nervousness disappear. A short while later a gentleman came through the doors and introduced himself. He told me he would be helping me get setup. I followed him to my cube and he gave me my laptop and some basic instruction for what to do on my first day. Throughout the day, he checked in with me several times. His constant check-ups allowed me to feel comfortable going to him with questions because I knew he genuinely wanted me to be comfortable and succeed.

I learned very quickly after that experience that he was not the only one that truly cared about helping me get the best of this wonderful opportunity I had. Everyone I spoke with in my first week and all summer made a point to tell me that if I need anything, anything at all that they would do anything they could to help me. I was amazed at how many people reached out to me and offered to help. Before the end of my first week, I already felt like a part of the community. I felt like the relationships, connections, friends and conversations I had were all sincere. The welcoming I felt in this community was unlike any other. This is a feeling I will never forget and I hope that everyone will have a chance to experience this at some point in their lives.

One of the things I was directed to look into during my first week was this new intranet platform thing called Inside EMC. I had no idea what to expect. I went to the website and it was immediately clear to me that the sense of community I felt was something that EMC worked very hard to maintain. At first, it was extremely confusing. I could not understand how a medium between social and productive content could be created. I slowly began posting some content and joining a few groups in hopes of meeting some other interns and learning more about EMC as a company. Within two weeks of starting I had already had a lot of conversations with people from all over the US and elsewhere around the world. I made friends in my first two weeks at EMC that I plan on staying in touch throughout college.

After getting acquainted with Inside EMC, I was contacted with some work. I had trouble understanding the acronyms and I knew as part of my job that I would be using them a lot. So I reached out to someone who was very willing to help. He was thrilled that I had questions and answered them as best he could. At that point I felt confident that I could do the work I was given and if I had a question or concern I could reach out. That realization changed my mindset and outlook on college, future jobs and the rest of my life in a big way. I will never hesitate to ask questions or become involved.

Now that the summer is coming to an end, the things I will miss most become apparent to me. I will miss the community, my desk, my friends, my co-workers, the building, the events and the work. Looking back now, I realize I will miss the things that intimidated me in the beginning. I am sad that I am getting ready to leave EMC but I could not be happier with the experience I had. I gained technological knowledge and experience, insight into who I am and what I want to do with my life, connections to people in the business world, life lessons I will never forget, and friendships I will cherish forever. I will carry all of these things with me to college and wherever life takes me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Career Differentiators in HR

Renee Murphy

Renee Murphy

Vice President, Global Talent Acquisition

 

I recently spoke to EMC’s HRLDPers during their orientation. HRLDP is EMC’s Human Resources Leadership Development Program. This program is made up of the brightest college graduates who aspire to have a career in HR; the program grooms them through three, nine month rotations across HR disciplines e.g. HR Business Partner, Talent Acquisition, Compensation etc.

I envy these young professionals. The exposure and support that they get through this program have proven to be career accelerators. The career trajectory of prior HRLDP program alumnae and the leadership positions that many hold across the EMC Federation speaks for itself.

The following pieces of advice received sparked a very positive dialogue:

The first thing I shared is: Know the business as well as the executives that you support – including the financials. Why the finances? Because in the end… all businesses are limited by finite resources and you need to fully understand the levers of control or constraints at play.

The other piece that I shared is: Know that your most strategic asset is the ability to influence – to influence you must build relationships with your business line partners, stay close to the actual pulse (organizational climate) and know the performance metrics of the organization. This may seem obvious but the common challenge that HR professionals face as their career grows is that they lose the pulse of the greater organization.

Engaging with these young professionals and listening to their feedback reminds me of what an amazing time to have a career in the technology industry. I couldn’t be more excited for and proud of these young professionals. It will be fun to watch them flourish.

Renee